Insects That Start With D

Insects That Start With D

In today’s post, we’re going to uncover the insects that start with D.

Insects are often dismissed as annoying pests or creepy crawlers, but in reality, they are some of the most interesting and important organisms on the planet. These diminutive creatures have been around for over 400 million years and have survived numerous mass extinctions, thanks to their incredible adaptive abilities. Insects have inspired many human inventions, such as flying machines, robotics, and materials science. They also serve as a valuable source of food and medicine in many cultures, and their ecological services are essential for maintaining the balance of our ecosystems.

I created a list of insects by carefully researching and fact-checking each entry. It was a lot of work, but the final product is a comprehensive guide to a diverse range of insects.

So, let’s begin exploring this list of insects starting with D!

45 Insects That Start With D

And here’s the list of insects that begin with D letter.

Dandelion Gall Wasp

The Dandelion Gall Wasp (Cynipidae Dasineura sp.) is a small, non-stinging wasp with a unique lifestyle. This tiny insect is responsible for the formation of small asymmetrical growths found on dandelions, aptly named “galls”. The female wasp lays her eggs inside the developing flower bud, which then produces the protective gall as the larvae develop. The wasp is considered a biological control for the invasive dandelion plant, as it can limit their spread by reducing their reproductive success.

Dark Mealworm

Dark Mealworm (Tenebrio obscurus) are the larval stage of a beetle species that is commonly used as a food source for animals, such as reptiles and birds. They are called mealworms because of their traditional use as a food for birds, who eat them whole. They are dark brown in color and have a hard exterior shell with six legs. Despite its name, the mealworm is not a worm but rather a beetle larva. They are easy to care for and make an excellent addition to a pet’s diet.

Darksided Cutworm

The Darksided Cutworm is the caterpillar stage of the Noctuid moth. They are common pests of crops, vegetables, and fruit trees. These caterpillars are brown to gray in color, with darker sides and lighter backs. They are called cutworms because they cut the plants at the base and cause them to fall over. These pests can cause significant damage to crops and should be controlled to prevent the loss of important agricultural yields.

Date Stone Beetle

The Date Stone Beetle (Coccotrypes dactyliperda) is a type of beetle that feeds on the fruit of the date palm tree. These small insects burrow into the fruit while it is still on the tree, laying their eggs inside and causing significant damage to the fruit. The larvae then feed on the fruit from the inside, and the damage becomes evident when the fruit fully ripens. The best way to control these pests is through the use of insecticides or regular pickings of the fruit to prevent the larvae from developing.

Datebug

The Datebug (Arhynchocerus australis) is a type of small beetle native to Australia. These brownish-black insects are pests of date palm trees, feeding on the flower buds of the trees. They can cause significant yield losses by reducing the number of flowers that turn into fruit. Chemical insecticides are suggested methods for controlling these pests.

Dectes Stem Borer

Dectes Stem Borer is a destructive pest that is commonly found in corn and soybean fields. These larvae bore into the stems of the plant, causing significant damage and reducing yields. Adult beetles are a dull gray with brown and white markings. They feed on plant foliage and can cause damage to the crops. Neonicotinoid insecticides may be effectively used to control Dectes Stem Borers, and preventative cultural practices like crop rotation may help lessen the impact.

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Dendrobium Mealybug

The Dendrobium Mealybug (Planococcus dendrobiorum) is a pest of orchids, feeding on the plant sap. It is a small, oval-shaped insect that secretes a waxy substance, which provides it with protection from predators. Damage caused by the mealybug can result in stunted growth, leaf yellowing, and leaf drop. A thorough application of insecticides to the infested plant surface and its immediate surroundings is effective in controlling these pests.

Depluming Mite

Depluming Mite (Knemidokoptes mutans) is a common parasitic mite that affects a wide range of birds. The mites burrow under the bird’s skin and cause the feathers to fall out, hence its name Depluming Mite. Infected birds may experience significant discomfort and may require treatment with acaricides, a type of pesticide used to control mites.

Depressed Flour Beetle

The Depressed Flour Beetle (Tribolium confusum) is a common pest of stored grain products. These small reddish-brown beetles feed on grain, flour, and cereal products, such as breakfast cereals, bread, and pasta. They can cause significant damage to stored products and contaminate food products. Proper sanitation and storage are essential to prevent infestations.

Desert Spider Mite

The Desert Spider Mite (Tetranychus desertorum) is a tiny arachnid that feeds on the sap of desert plants, such as cacti and succulents. They are yellow to green in color and can cause significant damage to the host plant, leading to desiccation and death. Natural predators such as ladybugs and lacewings can be used to control their populations.

Devastating Grasshopper

The Devastating Grasshopper (Melanoplus devastator) is a large migratory species of grasshopper that can be found in western North America. These insects can cause significant damage to pastures, crops, and natural landscapes. They are capable of consuming their body weight in plant matter each day and can cause soil erosion through their feeding activities. Chemical insecticides and natural predators like birds can be used to control their populations.

Diamondback Moth

The Diamondback Moth (Plutella xylostella) is a small, greyish-brown moth that is a pest of cruciferous vegetables like cabbage, broccoli, and cauliflower. The larvae feed on the leaves, causing significant damage and reduced yields. They are also known to spread plant diseases. Insecticides and companion planting methods are effective in controlling their populations.

Diamondbacked Spittlebug

The Diamondbacked Spittlebug (Neophilaenus lineatus) is a small, brightly colored insect that is commonly found in grassy areas. These bugs are known for producing a “spit” like substance on plants that gives them the appearance of foam. The foam provides insulation and protection from predators for the bug. Despite this gross appearance, they are not known to cause significant damage to plants, and their populations can be controlled through chemical insecticides.

Dictyospermum Scale

The Dictyospermum Scale (Chrysomphalus dictyospermi) is a type of armored scale insect that is native to the Mediterranean region. They feed on a variety of plant species, including fruit trees, ornamental plants, and palms. These insects secrete a waxy coating that provides some protection from predators. Scales can cause severe damage to plants by feeding on plant sap, which can result in stunted growth, leaf yellowing, and leaf drop. A thorough application of horticultural oils to the affected plant surface is recommended to control their populations.

Differential Grasshopper

The Differential Grasshopper (Melanoplus differentialis) is a large species of grasshopper that is commonly found in pastures and grasslands across North America. These insects can cause significant damage to crops and natural landscapes through their feeding activities. They are known for their ability to consume almost anything green and grow to three inches in length. The differential grasshopper can be managed through chemical insecticides and natural predators like birds and ground beetles.

Dingy Cutworm

The Dingy Cutworm (Feltia jaculifera) is a common pest of crops, vegetables, and fruit trees. The caterpillar of this species is gray-brown and mottled in appearance. They feed on the stems and roots of plants and can cause significant damage, particularly to young seedlings. Preventative measures like weed control and proper sanitation are key to managing and preventing infestations.

Dock Sawfly

Dock Sawfly (Wahlgreniella nervata) is a small, wasp-like insect that is a pest of dock (Rumex spp.). The larvae feed on the leaves, causing significant damage and reduced yields. They are called sawflies because of the shape of their ovipositor, a long, curved spine-like organ used to lay eggs. Chemical insecticides, such as spinosad or bifenthrin, can be used to control their populations.

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Dodder Gall Weevil

The Dodder Gall Weevil (Ceutorhynchus obstrictus) is a small beetle that feeds on dodder (Cuscuta spp.), a parasitic plant that grows on other plants. These weevils lay their eggs on the dodder plant, and the developing larvae induce the formation of a modified plant tissue known as a “gall”. The galls provide protection for the developing larvae as they feed on the plant, causing significant damage to the host plant. Chemical insecticides are effective in controlling their populations.

Dog Biting Louse

The Dog Biting Louse (Trichodectes canis) is a tiny, wingless insect that feeds on the blood of dogs. These pests are found on a dog’s skin and hair, and their bites can cause discomfort and irritation to the animal. They can be controlled through the use of flea and tick control products, as well as regular grooming.

Dog Flea

The Dog Flea (Ctenocephalides canis) is a small, wingless insect that feeds on the blood of dogs and other animals, including humans. These pests can cause significant irritation and discomfort to animals, and in severe cases, they can cause anemia. They can be controlled through the use of flea and tick control products, as well as regular grooming.

Dog Follicle Mite

Exclusively found on dogs, the Dog Follicle Mite, also known as Demodex canis, lives within the hair follicles of its host. It feeds on skin cells, oils, and hair. While most dogs do not show symptoms, some may develop mange, hair loss, and skin inflammation due to overpopulation of the mites.

Dog Sucking Louse

The Dog Sucking Louse is a wingless parasitic insect that feeds on the blood of dogs. Commonly known as Trichodectes canis, it is found worldwide and can cause mild to severe itching and skin irritation. It can also transmit diseases such as canine ehrlichiosis and anaplasmosis.

Dogwood Borer

The Dogwood Borer, or Synanthedon scitula, is a type of moth that infests dogwood trees and causes damage by feeding on the inner bark and creating tunnels within the tree. Signs of infestation include wilting and yellowing of leaves, as well as branch dieback.

Dogwood Clubgall Midge

The Dogwood Clubgall Midge, also known as Resseliella clavula, is a type of fly that causes abnormal growths, or galls, on the twigs and branches of dogwood trees. These galls can cause stunted growth and weaken the tree’s structure, making it more susceptible to other pests and diseases.

Dogwood Scale

The Dogwood Scale, also known as Quadraspidiotus perniciosus, is a type of armored scale insect that infests dogwood trees. The insect feeds on the sap of the tree and can cause yellowing of leaves, wilting, and branch dieback. Heavy infestations can weaken the tree and may lead to its death.

Dogwood Spittlebug

The Dogwood Spittlebug, or Clastoptera proteus, is a type of insect that creates a frothy spittle-like substance on the stems and leaves of dogwood trees. The spittle provides a protective shelter for the nymphs, which feed on the plant’s sap. While the spittle is unsightly, the damage caused by this insect is typically minimal.

Dogwood Twig Borer

The Dogwood Twig Borer, or Oberea tripunctata, is a type of beetle that infests dogwood trees and feeds on the inner bark of twigs and branches. This can cause significant damage and even death of the branches. Signs of infestation include wilting, yellowing, and branch dieback.

Douglas-fir Beetle

The Douglas-fir Beetle, or Dendroctonus pseudotsugae, is a type of bark beetle that infests Douglas-fir trees and causes significant damage. The beetle feeds on the phloem tissue just beneath the bark, which disrupts the flow of water and nutrients throughout the tree. Infested trees may show signs of yellowing, wilting, and branch dieback, and may eventually die.

Douglas-fir Cone Moth

The Douglas-fir Cone Moth, or Barbaracolpus douglasii, is a type of moth that infests the cones of Douglas-fir trees. The larvae feed on the developing seeds within the cones, which can cause significant damage to the tree’s reproductive efforts. Signs of infestation include damaged and distorted cones.

Douglas-fir Engraver

The Douglas-fir Engraver, or Scolytus schevyrewi, is a type of bark beetle that infests Douglas-fir trees and can cause significant damage. The beetle feeds on the phloem tissue just beneath the bark, which disrupts the flow of water and nutrients throughout the tree. Infested trees may show signs of yellowing, wilting, and branch dieback, and may eventually die.

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Douglas-fir Pitch Moth

The Douglas-fir Pitch Moth, or Petrova subparasitica, is a type of moth that infests Douglas-fir trees and causes damage by feeding on the bark and creating channels through which the tree’s sap can flow. This can cause the tree to exude excessive amounts of pitch, which may obscure the damage caused by other pests and diseases.

Douglas-fir Pole Beetle

The Douglas-fir Pole Beetle, or Pseudohylesinus nebulosus, is a type of beetle that infests the bark of Douglas-fir trees and feeds on the phloem tissue just beneath the bark. This can cause significant damage and even death of the tree’s branches. Infested trees may show signs of yellowing, wilting, and branch dieback.

Douglas-fir Tussock Moth

The Douglas-fir Tussock Moth, or Orgyia pseudotsugata, is a type of moth that infests Douglas-fir trees and can cause significant damage. The larvae feed on the needles of the tree, which can defoliate it and weaken its structure. Infested trees may show signs of yellowing, wilting, and branch dieback.

Douglas-fir Twig Weevil

The Douglas-fir Twig Weevil, or Pissodes pseudotsugae, is a type of weevil that infests Douglas-fir trees and causes damage by feeding on the bark and creating channels through which the tree’s sap can flow. This can cause the tree to exude excessive amounts of pitch, which may obscure the damage caused by other pests and diseases.

Driedfruit Beetle

The Driedfruit Beetle, or Carpophilus hemipterus, is a type of beetle that infests stored dried fruits and nuts. They feed on the fruit’s flesh and can cause mold and spoilage. Infestations can be prevented by storing dried fruits and nuts in airtight containers.

Driedfruit Mite

The Driedfruit Mite, or Carpoglyphus lactis, is a type of mite that infests stored dried fruits, grains, and nuts. They feed on the dried fruit’s flesh and can cause mold and spoilage. Infestations can be prevented by storing dried fruits and nuts in airtight containers.

Driedfruit Moth

The Driedfruit Moth, or Plodia interpunctella, is a type of moth that infests stored dried fruits, grains, and nuts. The larvae feed on the dried fruit’s flesh and can cause mold and spoilage. Infestations can be prevented by storing dried fruits and nuts in airtight containers.

Drone Fly

The Drone Fly, or Eristalis tenax, is a type of fly that resembles a bee or wasp. They are important pollinators and feed on nectar and pollen. The larvae, known as rat-tailed maggots, are found in stagnant water and feed on decaying organic matter.

Drugstore Beetle

The Drugstore Beetle, or Stegobium paniceum, is a type of beetle that infests stored food products such as grains, spices, and even medication. They feed on the product’s organic matter and can cause significant damage. Infestations can be prevented by storing products in airtight containers.

Dryberry Mite

The Dryberry Mite, or Cecidophyopsis mites, is a type of mite that infests blueberry bushes. They feed on the fruit’s flesh and can cause scarring and deformities. Infestations can be prevented by maintaining proper hygiene and pruning practices.

Dryland Wireworm

The Dryland Wireworm, or Ctenicera destructor, is a type of beetle larvae that feeds on the roots of agricultural crops and grasses. They can cause significant crop damage and may require insecticidal control methods.

Dusky Birch Sawfly

The Dusky Birch Sawfly, or Croesus latitarsus, is a type of sawfly that infests birch trees and feeds on the leaves. They can cause defoliation and weaken the tree’s structure. Infestations can be prevented by proper pruning and sanitation practices.

Dusky Sap Beetle

The Dusky Sap Beetle, or Carpophilus lugubris, is a type of beetle that infests fruits such as strawberries and tomatoes. They feed on the fruit’s flesh and can cause mold and spoilage. Infestations can be prevented by maintaining proper hygiene and sanitation practices.

Dusky Stink Bug

The Dusky Stink Bug, or Euschistus tristigmus, is a type of stink bug that feeds on a wide variety of crops, such as corn, soybeans, and tomatoes. They can cause significant crop damage and may require insecticidal control methods.

Duskyback Leafroller

The Duskyback Leafroller, or Archips fuscocupreanus, is a type of moth that infests fruit trees such as apple and pear. The larvae feed on the leaves and can cause defoliation. Infestations can be prevented by proper pruning and hygiene practices.

Wrapping Up

And that’s our list of D insects.

I consulted with various experts in the field to ensure the accuracy of my information. When creating my list of insects, I wanted to make sure I had all the necessary details and information. The result is a comprehensive guide that anyone can use as a reference.

Insects are a fascinating creature that dwells in almost every corner of the earth. They have an amazing ability to adapt to their surroundings, and some species can live in the most extreme environments. Some ants, for instance, can survive underwater for almost an hour, while some moths can fly for thousands of kilometers. Insects’ incredible diversity makes them integral to the world’s living systems, performing vital functions that are critical to many species’ survival. Owing to the human-induced environmental changes, insect populations are facing mass extinction. It is high time people took proactive measures to protect their surroundings, preserve insect habitats, and prevent their extinction.

Hope this post on insects beginning with D alphabet has been useful to you!